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    Micro-scale Fuel Processor for Hydrogen Fuels

    Technology ID 
    3667

    A Georgia Tech inventor has developed a fuel processor to produce hydrogen gas for use in fuel cells. The design is compact, lightweight, and portable, making it suitable for a variety of applications from portable electronics to automotive power. Liquid fuel is ejected from a storage tank through a micromachined atomizer system, creating droplets that are then impinge on a heated catalyst layer to flash evaporate and react to form the desired output product, such as hydrogen.

    Technology Categories 
    Researchers 

    Andrei G. Fedorov

    Dr. Fedorov’s research encompasses a unique blend of engineering, physics, and chemistry with applications in thermal management, nanomaterials, biomanufacturing, and power generation.

    His diverse portfolio features work at the interface of basic science and engineering, including innovations in hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, energy generation and storage, nanomanufacturing, microdevices, instrumentation for biomedical research, and thermal management of electronics. Dr. Fedorov's research also incorporates experimental and theoretical components, as he and his team design engineering system solutions that leverage thermal and fluid sciences for optimization and enhanced functionality. 

    His lab’s research has far-reaching applications, including fuel reformation, hydrogen generation for fuel cells, computer chip cooling, lab-on-a-chip microarrays for high throughput biomedical analysis, mechanosensing, and biochemical imaging of biological membranes. Dr. Fedorov employs a unique, interdisciplinary approach to his work but primarily utilizes research in chemical engineering and applied physics. This makes the technology he produces viable in a variety of industries including automotive, petrochemical, manufacturing, electronics, bioanalysis, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). 

     

    Research Goals  

    • Nanomaterials: Fabricating multi-scale hierarchical materials for nanoscience and nanoengineering applications 
    • Biochemistry and pharmaceuticals: Combining mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization for applications in proteomics, drug development, and biomarker discovery 
    • Electronics: Managing heat in compact electronics with nano-electrospray cooling film 
    • Biomanufacturing: Utilizing micro- and nano-fabrication advances to create a platform for real-time, label-free bioreactor monitoring 
    • Sustainable power generation: Designing new pathways for renewable energy that leverage fuel conversion processes and aerothermodynamics 

     

    Activities  

    • Thermo-fluid systems: Developing conceptual frameworks and practical tools for intelligent design, system-level integration, and optimal control of thermo-fluid systems 
    • Hydrogen and CO2 capture: Overcoming challenges of steam methane reforming for more sustainable, low-cost fuel conversion 
    • Thermophotovoltaic materials: Producing power and reducing thermal loads through aerothermodynamic energy conversion 
    • Engineering system enhancement: Understanding and controlling the multiscale dynamic interactions between different modes of heat transfer and chemical transformations  

     

    Leadership  

    • Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, George W. Woodruff School for Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech 
    • Rae S. and Frank H. Neely Chair, George W. Woodruff School for Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech 

    Scalable, Portable Hydrogen Generation

    Technology ID 
    3824, 3899, 6239

    Georgia Tech inventors have developed a method and apparatus for generating hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels at high power density and adaptive throughput with a very low (CO) concentration (<10 ppm), thus eliminating the need for separate CO-cleanup units. The technology combines the processes of fuel reforming, water gas shift, compression, and hydrogen separation into a single, scalable unit. It is ideal for use with proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells and power plants operating between 1 W and 100 kW.

    Technology Categories 
    Researchers 

    Andrei G. Fedorov

    Dr. Fedorov’s research encompasses a unique blend of engineering, physics, and chemistry with applications in thermal management, nanomaterials, biomanufacturing, and power generation.

    His diverse portfolio features work at the interface of basic science and engineering, including innovations in hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, energy generation and storage, nanomanufacturing, microdevices, instrumentation for biomedical research, and thermal management of electronics. Dr. Fedorov's research also incorporates experimental and theoretical components, as he and his team design engineering system solutions that leverage thermal and fluid sciences for optimization and enhanced functionality. 

    His lab’s research has far-reaching applications, including fuel reformation, hydrogen generation for fuel cells, computer chip cooling, lab-on-a-chip microarrays for high throughput biomedical analysis, mechanosensing, and biochemical imaging of biological membranes. Dr. Fedorov employs a unique, interdisciplinary approach to his work but primarily utilizes research in chemical engineering and applied physics. This makes the technology he produces viable in a variety of industries including automotive, petrochemical, manufacturing, electronics, bioanalysis, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). 

     

    Research Goals  

    • Nanomaterials: Fabricating multi-scale hierarchical materials for nanoscience and nanoengineering applications 
    • Biochemistry and pharmaceuticals: Combining mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization for applications in proteomics, drug development, and biomarker discovery 
    • Electronics: Managing heat in compact electronics with nano-electrospray cooling film 
    • Biomanufacturing: Utilizing micro- and nano-fabrication advances to create a platform for real-time, label-free bioreactor monitoring 
    • Sustainable power generation: Designing new pathways for renewable energy that leverage fuel conversion processes and aerothermodynamics 

     

    Activities  

    • Thermo-fluid systems: Developing conceptual frameworks and practical tools for intelligent design, system-level integration, and optimal control of thermo-fluid systems 
    • Hydrogen and CO2 capture: Overcoming challenges of steam methane reforming for more sustainable, low-cost fuel conversion 
    • Thermophotovoltaic materials: Producing power and reducing thermal loads through aerothermodynamic energy conversion 
    • Engineering system enhancement: Understanding and controlling the multiscale dynamic interactions between different modes of heat transfer and chemical transformations  

     

    Leadership  

    • Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, George W. Woodruff School for Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech 
    • Rae S. and Frank H. Neely Chair, George W. Woodruff School for Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech 

    David Damm

    This is just one of the many Georgia Tech researchers developing cutting-edge technologies with applications beyond the bench. Use the buttons provided to learn more about this researcher’s work, or visit our innovation database to search for other Georgia Tech inventions you need.

    Energy Storage for Automotive/Portable Applications

    Technology ID 
    3626

    Georgia Tech inventors have developed a chemical storage system that provides reversible hydrogen storage and release at ultra-high capacity, density, speed, and ease, providing for low energy cost. The technology is based on a foldable polymer backbone that allows reversible uptake/storage/release of hydrogen fuel in response to thermal, chemical, mechanical, magnetic, electrical, or light stimuli.

    Researchers 

    Andrei G. Fedorov

    Dr. Fedorov’s research encompasses a unique blend of engineering, physics, and chemistry with applications in thermal management, nanomaterials, biomanufacturing, and power generation.

    His diverse portfolio features work at the interface of basic science and engineering, including innovations in hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, energy generation and storage, nanomanufacturing, microdevices, instrumentation for biomedical research, and thermal management of electronics. Dr. Fedorov's research also incorporates experimental and theoretical components, as he and his team design engineering system solutions that leverage thermal and fluid sciences for optimization and enhanced functionality. 

    His lab’s research has far-reaching applications, including fuel reformation, hydrogen generation for fuel cells, computer chip cooling, lab-on-a-chip microarrays for high throughput biomedical analysis, mechanosensing, and biochemical imaging of biological membranes. Dr. Fedorov employs a unique, interdisciplinary approach to his work but primarily utilizes research in chemical engineering and applied physics. This makes the technology he produces viable in a variety of industries including automotive, petrochemical, manufacturing, electronics, bioanalysis, and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). 

     

    Research Goals  

    • Nanomaterials: Fabricating multi-scale hierarchical materials for nanoscience and nanoengineering applications 
    • Biochemistry and pharmaceuticals: Combining mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization for applications in proteomics, drug development, and biomarker discovery 
    • Electronics: Managing heat in compact electronics with nano-electrospray cooling film 
    • Biomanufacturing: Utilizing micro- and nano-fabrication advances to create a platform for real-time, label-free bioreactor monitoring 
    • Sustainable power generation: Designing new pathways for renewable energy that leverage fuel conversion processes and aerothermodynamics 

     

    Activities  

    • Thermo-fluid systems: Developing conceptual frameworks and practical tools for intelligent design, system-level integration, and optimal control of thermo-fluid systems 
    • Hydrogen and CO2 capture: Overcoming challenges of steam methane reforming for more sustainable, low-cost fuel conversion 
    • Thermophotovoltaic materials: Producing power and reducing thermal loads through aerothermodynamic energy conversion 
    • Engineering system enhancement: Understanding and controlling the multiscale dynamic interactions between different modes of heat transfer and chemical transformations  

     

    Leadership  

    • Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, George W. Woodruff School for Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech 
    • Rae S. and Frank H. Neely Chair, George W. Woodruff School for Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech